What is DNS? How Does DNS Work? What are the Components of DNS?

DNS stands for “domain name system”.

Domain Name Servers are the Internet’s equivalent of a phone book. They maintain a record of directory of domain names and translate them to IP addresses. It is a technology standard for managing names of public websites. DNS allows you to type names into your browser and your computer to automatically find and connect to that address on the Internet.

DNS is implemented using two software components namely, the server and the client. Both components are run as background services.

DNS controls your domain name’s website and email settings. When visitors go to your domain name, its DNS settings control which company’s server it reaches out to.

It works in the background and converts human-readable website names into computer-readable numerical IP addresses.

How DNS Works?

DNS clients send requests and receive responses from DNS servers. The Requests contain a name, which results in an IP address being returned from the server. The Requests containing an IP address and resulting in a name are called reverse DNS lookups.

Why DNS is Important?

Domain Name Servers are the Internet’s equivalent of a phone book. They maintain a record of directory of domain names and translate them to IP addresses. Without DNS, you would only be able to visit any website by visiting its IP address directly only.

 

Components of DNS

It’s made up of many different elements. Here’s a summary of each component.

  • Nameserver – A nameserver is a server which controls the DNS for a domain. Nameservers “point” your domain name to the company that controls your DNS settings and allow you to choose which server will manage your webpage, email, etc.
  • MX Records – MX records are the records for managing your mail server. It allows you to choose the server for sending and retrieving the mails.
  • A Record – An A Record points your domain name to an individual server using an IP address. Example – 192.168.1.1. You can also use A Records to point subdomains
  • CNAME – A CNAME points a domain or a subdomain to another domain name.
  • Zone File – It store all of your domain’s DNS settings.
  • TXT Record – It contains simple text records.
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